EASTER SALE IN PROGRESS! TAKE AN ADDITIONAL 25% OFF EVERY ITEM.Welcome to our new website. We have an enormous stock of antique maps and prints. Only a very small portion have been loaded to this website, but we are adding more prints every day. If you have a specific topic or print you are looking for please contact us. Please enjoy browsing through our website. You can search by topic, but we also encourage you to utilize the search function.
EASTER SALE IN PROGRESS! TAKE AN ADDITIONAL 25% OFF EVERY ITEM.Welcome to our new website. We have an enormous stock of antique maps and prints. Only a very small portion have been loaded to this website, but we are adding more prints every day. If you have a specific topic or print you are looking for please contact us. Please enjoy browsing through our website. You can search by topic, but we also encourage you to utilize the search function.
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"Ornatissimi Triumphié"  Copper etching by Johan van den Aveele(n) (1650-1727) The artist used several slightly different spellings of his name)  This etching is based upon Onofrio Panvinio (1530-1568), who published "Fasti et triumph Roamnorum" in the year 1557.

Rome "Ornatissimi Triumphié"

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"Ornatissimi Triumphié"

Copper etching by Johan van den Aveele(n) (1650-1727) The artist used several slightly different spellings of his name)

This etching is based upon Onofrio Panvinio (1530-1568), who published "Fasti et triumph Roamnorum" in the year 1557.

Fold-out copper engraving across 4 book pages (see measurements below)

Van den Aveele(n) was called to Stockholm to help engrave the monumental work by Dahlberg "Sueccia antique et hodierna", which was published in 1716 and for which Aveelen contributed 160 copper etchings.

The Triumphal Procession dates back to his time in Leiden. The date on the print, 1580, however is the date of the happening of the shown procession - NOT the date of creation of the print or its publishing. The time span of Roman triumphal processions begins with Romulus and stretches till the Habsburg emperor Charles V

Triumphal processions were typically held celebrating a Roman military victory

There are Roman numbers I (1) through XL (50) each identifying the participants of the snake-like show. Lower left with 2 insets (within the entire large copper etching): Adlocutioe The Emperor's speech to the victorious troops. And Sacrificium militate: Offering of thanks to the Gods for the victory.

Light age toning. Narrow margins due to book size. Etching spreading across 4 boo pages. Print had been mounted earlier. There are minimal remnants of fastenings in three places (upper left corner, top center, upper right corner). Other minor traces of age and use. Very good impression. Condition nearly very good.

37,7 x 75,1 cm (ca. 14.8 x 29.6")

 


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