A South Prospect Of Ye Flourishing City Of New-York In The Province Of New York. North America  A tone lithograph (tone in very light green) by G. Hayward for Valentine's Manuel. New York, 1848. The lithograph was a text illustration for a historical account of NYC, published in 1853.

New York, Prospect Of Ye Flourishing

Regular price $900.00 Sale price $1,500.00
Shipping calculated at checkout.

A South Prospect Of Ye Flourishing City Of New-York In The Province Of New York. North America

A tone lithograph (tone in very light green) by G. Hayward for Valentine's Manuel. New York, 1848. The lithograph was a text illustration for a historical account of NYC, published in 1853. Therefore it was folded several times to fit book size. Three folds are hardly visible, but one remains clearly noticeable (vertical lines above the word "city" in the title), even after careful and thorough restauration. Upper and lower margins are narrow. Margins on sides are ample. Overall appearance is Good!

Total page: 21.5 x 52.0 cm ( 8.4 x 20")
View only:15.5 x 47.6 cm ( 6.1 x 18.7")

 

This panoramic view of New York City across the Hudson River is historically as interesting as it is a decorative retro-glance at NYC to the seventeenth century, when New York was a small town. A lively staffage of sailing ships add historical interest to the scene. This print was reduced from the Original Copy which is? feet 6 inches in length and 28 inches wide. Presented to the New York Society Library 1848 by Mrs. Maria Peebles of Lansigburgh, N.Y.

The legend below the view begins as follows:

Captain Henry Hudson discovered this Country Anno 1609 and sold it to the Hollanders & and Letters Patent being granted to some Merchants by the States a Colony was settled Anno 1614 called New Netherlands but Sr. Samuel Argal, Governor of Virginia, gave them disturbance....

Follows the known early historry of the State and of NYC. The text concludes: The Province abounds with all necessarys of Life & has a Governour, Council & General Assembly, the City has Mayor, Aldermen & Sheriff and is under the Reguation of the English Laws & Customs. The trade of the City in a few years is become almost Universal, her Merchants having extended their Commerce to most parts of the known World. The Harbour is safe for Ships and the greatest burthens and very securelying twelve miles from the sea having great convenience of Buildings of Ships & vast Quantities of fine Timber in the adjacent Woods.

There are indicating numbers in the view corresponding to the numbers in the legend below the paraphrased text:

1. The Fort. 2. The Chappel of the Fort. 3. The Secretaries Office. 4. The Great Dock with a bridge over it. 5. The Ruines of White Hall built Governour Duncan. 6. Part of Nutten Island. 7. Part of Long Island. 8. The Lower Market. 9. The Crane. 10. The Great Flesh Market. 11. The City Arms supported by Peace. 12. The Dutch Church. 13. The English Church. 14. The City Hall. 15. The Exchange. 16. The French Church. 17. Upper Market. 18. The Station Ship. (19. number missing) The Warf. 20. The Arms of Province supported by Plenty. 21. Warfs for building ships. 22. The Ferry House to Long Island. 23. A Pen for Oxen and Cattel designed for the Market. 24. Colonel Morris' Fancy to Windwart.

 

The text in the lower center of the view, underneith Coat of Arms reads:

To His Excellency George Clinton Esqu. Captain General & Governour in Chief of the Province of New York & Territories thereon depending in America. This South Prospect of New York is most humbly dedicated by your excellency's most Humble & obedient Servt. Thos. Bakewell Published March 25th 1746


Share this Product


More from this collection