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"De edificatione templi"  On either side of woodcut fictional plans of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem. Following the Tent of Meeting (Tabernacle) this was the first Jewish temple built of stone. Nebukadnezar II. destroyed it. After the Babylonian captivity a second temple was built, which was lacking the most sacred part: The Ark of the Covenant, missing since the destruction of the first temple. The second temple was destroyed by the Romas. Left nowadays is only part of the temple's wall: The Wailing Wall.
"De edificatione templi"  On either side of woodcut fictional plans of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem. Following the Tent of Meeting (Tabernacle) this was the first Jewish temple built of stone. Nebukadnezar II. destroyed it. After the Babylonian captivity a second temple was built, which was lacking the most sacred part: The Ark of the Covenant, missing since the destruction of the first temple. The second temple was destroyed by the Romas. Left nowadays is only part of the temple's wall: The Wailing Wall.
"De edificatione templi"  On either side of woodcut fictional plans of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem. Following the Tent of Meeting (Tabernacle) this was the first Jewish temple built of stone. Nebukadnezar II. destroyed it. After the Babylonian captivity a second temple was built, which was lacking the most sacred part: The Ark of the Covenant, missing since the destruction of the first temple. The second temple was destroyed by the Romas. Left nowadays is only part of the temple's wall: The Wailing Wall.
"De edificatione templi"  On either side of woodcut fictional plans of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem. Following the Tent of Meeting (Tabernacle) this was the first Jewish temple built of stone. Nebukadnezar II. destroyed it. After the Babylonian captivity a second temple was built, which was lacking the most sacred part: The Ark of the Covenant, missing since the destruction of the first temple. The second temple was destroyed by the Romas. Left nowadays is only part of the temple's wall: The Wailing Wall.

Architecture, Religious, fictional plans of Solomon's Temple, Schedel

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"De edificatione templi"

On either side of woodcut fictional plans of Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem. Following the Tent of Meeting (Tabernacle) this was the first Jewish temple built of stone. Nebukadnezar II. destroyed it. After the Babylonian captivity a second temple was built, which was lacking the most sacred part: The Ark of the Covenant, missing since the destruction of the first temple. The second temple was destroyed by the Romas. Left nowadays is only part of the temple's wall: The Wailing Wall.

Salomon's Temple is also an important constituent of Freemasonry and Rosicrucians. There is a clearcut relatedness to Salomon's Temple, based on the ideas of early habitual evidence during the Middle Ages.

Woodcut from the Nuremberg Cronicle by Hartmann Schedel (1440-1515).

Schedel, medical doctor, humanist and historian ist the author of the Cronicle. It was published by Anto Koberger (14440 / 45 - 1513), in Nuremberg in the year 1493 (Latin edition in the month of May, the very small and therefore rare German edition in December 1493).

Upper margin corner shows traces of age: it is frayed, tatered and brittle with repair. Otherwise in very good condition, especially when considering, that this woodcut is over 500 years old. Latin (first) edition

The entire page: 45,5 x 32 cm (17.9 x 12.6")

 

 

"De edificatione templi"

Auf beiden Seiten des Holzschnitts mehr oder weniger fiktive Darstellungen des Salomonischen Tempels. In der Nachfolge der Stiftshütte, die ein mobiles Zelt war, war der Jerusalemer Tempel der erste steinerne Tempel der Juden. Nebukadnezar II hat ihn zerstört, als er die Juden in die "Babylonische Gefangenschaft" nahm.

Der an gleicher Stelle errichtete zweite Tempel auf dem Tempelberg in Jerusalem erreichte nicht die Pracht. des ersten. Ihm fehlte vor allem das Allerheiligste der Juden : die Bundeslade, die seit der Zerstörung des ersten Tempels vermisst wird. Nach der Zerstörung des zweiten Tempels durch die Römer bestehen heute nur noch Reste der Tempelmauer: Die Klagemauer.

Der Jerusalemer Tempel ist auch Bestandteil der Tradition der Freimaurer und Rosenkreuzer.Es gibt einen deutlichen Bezug zum Salomonischen Tempel, der sich in den Gebräuchen der Steinmetzbauhütten des Mittelalters manifestiert.

Holzschnitt aus der Weltchronik von Hartmann Schedel (1440-1515). Schedel war Arzt, umfangreich gebildeter Humanist und Historiker. Die Nürnberger Chronik, auch Schedelsche Weltchronik genannt, ist sein wichtigstes Werk. Das umfangreiche, grossformatige Werk entstand 1493 in Nürnberg. Anton Koberger (1440 bis 1445 - Geburtsjahr nicht genau bekannt - 1513) verlegte dieses extrem bedeutende Inkunabelwerk, zunächst in Latein (Mai 149, dann in deutscher Sprache (Dezember 1493).

Obere Marge hat in einer Ecke Altersschäden (ausgefranst, brüchig). Etwas repariert.Ansonsten ist der Holzschnitt in sehr gutem Zustand, zumal er über 500 Jahre alt ist. Lateinische (erste) Ausgabe.

Die ganze Seite: 45,5 x 32 cm

The Nuremberg Chronicle, Nuremberg 1493

 

In May of 1493 appeared in the Latin language one of the earliest voluminous books, fully illustrated with 1809 woodcuts printed from 645 woodblocks: The Nuremberg Chronicle.

The story of this book is a story of superlatives. Hartmann Schedel, a medical doctor in Nuremberg who owned the most important private collection of books in all of Europe was the author. His library made the writing of this book possible. The writing and production of this book was teamwork. Among the more famous cooperators were Wilhelm Pleydenwurff and the painter and expert woodcutter Michael Wolgemut (1434-1519) who became the first noted book illustrator. His most famous apprentice up to 1489 was Albrecht Dürer who is supposedly contributed two woodcuts to the Chronicle. Poet Konrad Celtis contributed the German text which was published in December of the same year.

Sebald Schreyer (1446-1520), a wealthy merchant in Nuremberg, financed the enduring and long lasting preparations which went into the production of this book which is a "History of the World" from Genesis to the date of printing. The double page size woodcuts of city views are, with the exception of Lübeck, the first ever printed views. Large sized and sometimes in bold, bright hand coloring they are considered the crowns of city view collections.

Columbus had already "discovered" America when the Schedel Chronicle appeared on the book market. But no news of this stunning discovery had reached the editors in time to be included in this remarkable book, so that, alas, there is no mention of "The New World" in it. However it remains a fact that the Nuremberg Chronicle is one of the most noted and valuable incunabila.


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